Skip to main content

Francis Bacon included in Tate Britain's New Presentation of the 'World's Greatest Collection of British Art'

Posted on 2013-05-22 09:13:57 in CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Francis Bacon art is included in the Tate Britain's 'BP Walk through British Art', the gallery's new presentation of the "World's Greatest Collection of British Art", which opened to the public on May 14th. The Francis Bacon work on display is Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, C. 1944. This was previously joined by Painted Screen, c.1929, Study for a Portrait, 1952, and Triptych - August 1972 but these latter works have since been removed from the display.

This continuous chronological display of the national collection of British art is a walk through time from the 1500s to present day. 500 artworks are displayed over 20 galleries with no designated theme or movement. Some pieces often separated when hung by movement or genre now find themselves chronologically presented side-by-side. The aim of this is to achieve open conversation, giving audiences a more neutral view of the range of art from historical moments.

Francis Bacon is being displayed alongside such major artists as John Constable, William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough, George Stubbs, J.M.W. Turner, Gwen John, Stanley Spencer, L.S. Lowry, John Everett Millais, Bridget Riley, Damien Hirst, David Hockney, and Rachel Whiteread.

'BP Walk through British Art' is part of BP Displays - Supported by BP. The display is on now, admission is free, view more information on the Tate Britain website.

BP Walk through British Art 
Tate Britain Millbank 
London SW1P 4RG 
Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk 
Call: +44 (0)20 7887 8888 

Words reference: Tate Britain press release and website. Special thanks to Kate Moores.

Please note this article has been updated since originally published. All details including featured works, exhibition days/hours are subject to change, for all confirmation please contact Tate Britain ahead of your visit.

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS