GRAPHIC WORKS OF BACON EXHIBITED IN THE NETHERLANDS

Francis Bacon, 'Three Studies for a Portrait of Peter Beard 1975' (centre panel), © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

A print version of the above Francis Bacon painting 'Three Studies for a Portrait of Peter Beard 1975' (centre panel) is on display at the Noordbrabants Museum. Image © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

In a world’s first Het Noordbrabants Museum are exhibiting the most important works of the graphic oeuvre of Francis Bacon in an exhibition entitled: Francis Bacon – The Graphic Works.

The exhibition features 27 lithographs, etchings and aquatints from the period 1971-1991. All displayed graphic works are based on the artist’s personal selection from his paintings, originating from commissions for book illustrations, editions made for exhibitions, and private editions.

For more information including opening hours please visit the Het Noordbrabants Museum website.

Francis Bacon – The Graphic Works
April 12th – August 24th 2014
Het Noordbrabants Museum
Verwersstraat 41
’s-Hertogenbosch
info@hnbm.nl
073-6877877

Word ref: Het Noordbrabants Museum website.
Please note that all exhibition details including dates and displayed works are subject to change, please consult Het Noordbrabants Museum for all confirmation.

FURTHER INFORMATION ON BACON MOORE EXHIBITION AT THE AGO CANADA

Francis Bacon, 'Crucifixion' 1933, oil on canvas © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Crucifixion' 1933, oil on canvas © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon will make his Canadian debut on April 5th at the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) appearing alongside rarely-seen works by British sculptor Henry Moore in the exhibition: ‘Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty‘.

The exhibition will feature over 130 artworks including paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs and archive materials. Francis Bacon paintings due to be displayed include ‘Second Version of Triptych 1944′, Lying Figure in a Mirror’ 1971, and the pictured ‘Crucifixion’ 1933, which is one of Bacon’s earliest work.

Terror and Beauty will explore the two artists’ shared fascination with the human form in relation to the violence of the Second World War and other key events from the 20th century.

Although they were neither friends or collaborators Bacon and Moore were contemporaries who shared an obsession with expressing themes of violence, trauma and conflict, both social and personal.

This exhibition is organised in collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum, and, was originally curated by Richard Calvocoressi CBE, Director of The Henry Moore Foundation, and Martin Harrison, editor of the catalogue raisonné on Francis Bacon. Terror and Beauty is guest-curated at the AGO by York University’s Dan Adler, and features numerous loans from The Henry Moore Foundation, Tate Britain, The Estate of Francis Bacon and MOMA, and is thematic in nature, pairing figural and abstract works to explore ideas of confinement, conflict and restoration. For further information including tickets and related events please click here.

Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty
April 5th – July 20th 2014
Art Gallery of Ontario
Canada, M5T 1G4

*Please note exhibition details, including art displayed and dates are subject to change, for queries please consult the AGO.
Word ref: AGO press release

NEW FRANCIS BACON ART FOUNDATION SET TO OPEN IN MONACO IN AUTUMN OF 2014

Monte Carlo, November 1981, Francis Bacon with Reinhard Hassert, © Eddy Batache, MB Art Collection

Francis Bacon with Reinhard Hassert in Monte Carlo, November 1981. Coll. MB Art Foundation © Eddy Batache

The FRANCIS BACON MB Art Foundation, based in Monaco, is a private non-profit institute dedicating its scholarly activities and research to the most compelling and controversial British figurative artist of the post-war era.

The Foundation’s mission is to promote a deeper understanding of the work and life of Francis Bacon worldwide, with a particular focus on the time that the artist lived and worked in Monaco and Southern France. This institute will: support original research, sponsor emerging artists, organize exhibitions and seminars on Francis Bacon with local and international institutions, and fund projects related to the artist.

The Estate of Francis Bacon welcomes the Foundation and will collaborate with it on research and educational activities. The art historian Martin Harrison, editor of the Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné, is on the board of this institute.

The Foundation was established by Majid Boustany, who first came across Francis Bacon’s work whilst taking a course in Art History alongside his Business and International Relation studies. An encounter with Bacon’s seminal triptych ‘Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion’ (1944) at Tate Britain started Boustany on a path of discovery that continues to this day: “Bacon’s enigmatic triptych challenged interpretation and triggered in me the need to explore his world”, Boustany says.

Boustany’s fascination for Bacon’s oeuvre has now lasted for more than twenty years; he quickly discovered that the artist had lived in Monaco from July 1946 to the early 1950s and frequently returned to the Principality throughout his life. “Bacon often made references to his life and work in Monaco” says Boustany, who himself has called Monaco home for more than thirty years. Boustany decided to house his Foundation on the ground floor of the Villa Elise, 21 Boulevard d’Italie, situated at the heart of Monaco. The institute will be open by appointment to scholars, researchers and the general public throughout the year.

The founder has been building a comprehensive art collection over a number of years that now includes: a selection of paintings by Francis Bacon from the late 1920s to the early 1980s and work by key peers and influences, a unique photographic archive on the artist by leading photographers and pictures by his friends and lovers, a comprehensive collection of Bacon exhibition catalogues, a wide selection of the artist’s graphic works, a unique array of working documents from Bacon’s various studios, a number of rare items from Bacon’s furniture and rug design period and an extensive library on the artist offering an essential resource for scholars.

The website of the Foundation (www.mbartfoundation.com) will be live by the end of September 2014.

BACON PAINTING ON DISPLAY AT STEPHEN FRIEDMAN GALLERY, LONDON

Francis Bacon’s painting ‘Study from the Human Body’ 1981 features in, and lends its title to, a new group exhibition at the Stephen Friedman Gallery: ‘Study from the Human Body’.

Francis Bacon, 'Study from the Human Body' 1981, oil on canvas © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Study from the Human Body' 1981, oil on canvas © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

The exhibition draws inspiration from the recent Ashmolean Bacon Moore exhibition, pivoting around the two twentieth century artists: Francis Bacon and Henry Moore. The show aims to capture the complex discourse on the human form by aligning the timeless influence of Bacon and Moore with a group of international Artists.

As well as Bacon’s painting, works from the following artists are included in this exhibition: Stephan Balkenhol, Huma Bhabha, Tom Friedman, Kendell Geers, Paul McDevitt, Yoshitomo Nara, Catherine Opie, Yinka Shonibare MBE, David Shrigley, Jiro Takamatsu and Kehinde Wiley.

The exhibition is being described as a meeting of tradition and innovation, connoisseurship and humour, offering a comprehensive exploration of the impact of Francis Bacon and Henry Moore on contemporary figurative art. For more information please visit the Stephen Friedman Gallery website here.

Study from the Human Body
14th March – 26th April 2014
Stephen Friedman Gallery
No. 11 & 25-28 Old Burlington Street
London, W1S 3AN

Please note that exhibition details including dates are subject to change, please consult the Stephen Friedman Gallery for any confirmation.
Word ref: Stephen Friedman Gallery website and press release, special thanks to Exhibitions Manager Ellie Charman

NEW CANADIAN EXHIBITION: FRANCIS BACON HENRY MOORE: TERROR AND BEAUTY

AGO Poster, Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty, featuring Francis Bacon, 'Study for Portrait II (after the life Mask of William Blake), 1955, Tate, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

AGO Poster, Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty, featuring Francis Bacon, 'Study for Portrait II (after the life Mask of William Blake), 1955, Tate, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

In April a new major exhibition entitled ‘Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty’ is coming to the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO). When it opens on April 5th it will be the first ever Canadian exhibition of Francis Bacon’s work.

‘Terror and Beauty’ will draw on the artists’ experiences during times of conflict and violence, including the London Blitz, to examine how confinement and angst fostered their extraordinary creativity and unique visions. It will also demonstrate how the two artists reflected differently upon torment.

Francis Bacon Henry Moore: ‘Terror and Beauty’ has been curated for the AGO by Dan Adler, associate professor of art history at York University. It will feature more than 60 works by the two influential 20th-century artists, including never-before-seen Moore artworks. Alongside Bacon’s paintings and Moore’s sculptures, a number of photographs and drawings dating from the Second World War will be displayed.

This exhibition is organised by the AGO in collaboration with the Ashmolean Museum. The exhibition was originally curated by Richard Calvocoressi CBE, Director of The Henry Moore Foundation, and Martin Harrison, editor of the Francis Bacon catalogue raisonné. Information on the previous Ashmolean Francis Bacon Henry Moore exhibition can be found on the ‘past exhibitions’ section of our blog.

The AGO has events to accompany the exhibition, including a screening of the John Maybury film ‘Love is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon’ (1998). You can find more information about AGO events here. Further exhibition information including opening times and ticket details, is available via the AGO here.

Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Terror and Beauty
April 5th – July 20th 2014
Art Gallery of Ontario
Canada, M5T 1G4

*Please note exhibition details, including dates are subject to change, for queries please consult the AGO.
Word ref: AGO website

BACON TRIPTYCH ON DISPLAY IN AMSTERDAM

Francis Bacon, 'In Memory of George Dyer', 1971, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'In Memory of George Dyer', 1971, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon’s triptych ‘In Memory of George Dyer’, 1971 goes on display at De Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam, from today.

‘In Memory of George Dyer’ will be on display at De Nieuwe Kerk from February 21st – March 30th 2014, as part of the church’s ‘Masterwork’ series. For further information including opening hours and tickets please click here.*

Triptychs are traditionally a religious format, Bacon’s is a memorial to the artist’s former partner George Dyer. In 1971 Dyer committed suicide in Paris, two days before Bacon’s major retrospective was to open at the Grand Palais. Dyer’s form appears in all three panels of the triptych – as a boxer, reflection, and a shadowy figure inserting a key in a door. Both physicality and spirituality are interpreted in this piece, with the subject’s suspension between realities on the threshold between life and death.

De Nieuwe Kerk’s Masterwork series was launched in 2011. Each year one masterpiece with a religious or spiritual dimension is displayed in the Church. 2011 exhibited Rembrandt’s ‘The Holy Family’ 1645, and 2012 exhibited Andy Warhol’s ‘The Last Supper (pink)’ 1986.

De Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam
Dam Square
Amsterdam
T: 020 – 626 81 68
mail@nieuwekerk.nl

*Please note exhibition times/dates are subject to change. Please check De Nieuwe Kerk website for further information: http://www.nieuwekerk.nl/
Word ref: De Nieuwe Kerk website

FREE BACON TALK AT MANCHESTER ART GALLERY

Francis Bacon, 'Portrait of Lucian Freud', 1951, oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Portrait of Lucian Freud', 1951, oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Free entry, 6:30pm, Thursday 6th March 2014, Manchester Art Gallery*

In association with the year-long display ‘Radical Figures: Post-war British Figurative Painting’ at the Manchester Art Gallery, Dr Rina Arya will be giving a talk on Francis Bacon, entitled: ‘Post-war British figurative painting’.

This talk will be about Francis Bacon’s complex figuration that involved a balance between figuration and abstraction. His work will be examined alongside other representations of the human figure in post-war art to look at how artists rehabilitated figuration.

The talk is a part of Manchester Art Gallery’s ‘Thursday Lates’. It takes place at the Gallery, on Thursday March 6th, at 6:30pm, and is free to attend. For more information click here.

Dr Rina Arya is a Reader at the University of Wolverhampton. She has written widely on Bacon, including her monograph Francis Bacon: Painting in a Godless World (2012), which was long-listed for the William M.B. Berger Prize for British Art History in 2013. Her latest book is Abjection and Representation: An Exploration of Abjection in the Visual Arts, Film and Literature (2014).

The exhibition ‘Radical Figures: Post-war British Figurative Painting’ displays the following Francis Bacon pieces: ‘Portrait of Henrietta Moraes on a Blue Couch’, 1965, and ‘Portrait of Lucian Freud’, 1951 (pictured). Read more about the display via the Manchester Art Gallery here, and via a previous blog post here.

Manchester Art Gallery
www.manchestergalleries.org/
0161 235 8888
@mcrartgallery
Open Monday – Sunday 10am – 5pm
(Late night opening on Thursday until 9pm)

*Please note: Exhibition/event details, dates and times, and paintings displayed, are subject to change. For any questions please check with the Manchester Art Gallery for confirmation.

FRANCIS BACON: THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE. Edited by Martin Harrison – FINAL CALL FOR WORKS

The Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné will go on press in October 2014, and the final meeting of the Francis Bacon Authentication Committee will take place in London on May 23rd 2014.

Owners of paintings by Francis Bacon are requested to contact the Catalogue Raisonné Committee via The Estate of Francis Bacon at mail@francis-bacon.com or by post at:

The Estate of Francis Bacon
London House
Unit 2
266 Fulham Road
London SW10 9EL.

All information received will be treated in the strictest confidence and requests for anonymity will be honoured.

The following works have not been located, and information as to their whereabouts is urgently sought: Lying Figure (1953); Man with Head Wound (1955); Mlle Suzy Solidor (1957); Head of Woman (1961).

Francis Bacon, 'Man with Head Wound', 1955, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Man with Head Wound', 1955, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Lying Figure' c.1953, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Lying Figure' c.1953, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francis Bacon, 'Mlle Suzy Solidor', 1957, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Mlle Suzy Solidor', 1957, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Head of Woman', 1961, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon, 'Head of Woman', 1961, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

BACON ART TO BE EXHIBITED AND AUCTIONED IN LONDON

'Portrait of George Dyer Talking' © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

'Portrait of George Dyer Talking' © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon’s ‘Portrait of George Dyer Talking’ 1966, and ‘Study for a Portrait’ 1978, will be exhibited at Christie’s London ahead of their auction later this month. ‘Portrait of George Dyer Talking’ was previously displayed in New York in January. Both works go on show from Saturday February 8th – 13th at Christie’s London King Street Saleroom.* The paintings will be auctioned as part of the ‘Post-War Contemporary Art Evening Auction’ on February 13th 2014.

Bacon and Dyer met in Soho in the autumn of 1963 with Dyer becoming arguably the artist’s greatest love and muse. ‘Portrait of George Dyer Talking’ was originally undertaken from a series of photographs taken by John Deakin around 1965. This painting is the second of eleven of Dyer that Bacon began in 1966, and completed in 1968. Bacon returned to this theme in similarly emotionally-loaded but more tragic circumstances following Dyer’s death in 1971, two days before Bacon’s major retrospective opened at the Grand Palais.

“Not an hour goes by when I don’t think about George”
(F. Bacon, quoted in M. Peppiatt, Francis Bacon: Anatomy of an Enigma, London 1996, p. 260).

Much can be interpreted from this early painting of Dyer which appears to project energy and life. The piece is spoken of as full of metaphors of both Dyer’s character, and Bacon’s reactions with it. Everything, from the subject’s twisted posture, the unorganised paperwork, the strokes of paint across Dyer’s mouth, all appear strongly energetic. Even the angle of the hanging, naked light bulb’s pull switch, and sweeping background (inspired by Bacon’s own raw studio) eludes to dramatic kinetic energy, almost as if the room is revolving at speed around a frustrated Dyer.

“the very form that you make has an implication when you are painting somebody, you know that you are of course, trying to get near not only to their appearance but also to the way they have affected you, because every shape has an implication”
(F. Bacon, quoted in D. Sylvester (ed.), The Brutality of Fact: Interviews with Francis Bacon, London 1987, p. 130).

Portrait of George Dyer Talking has been included in many important Bacon exhibitions. These include exhibitions at Galerie Maeght, Paris, in 1966-1967; Malborough Fine Art Ltd. in 1967 – the only time it has been seen in public in the UK; the Retrospective at the Grand Palace in 1971-1972; the Museo de Bellas Artes in Caracas in 1973; the Museo d’Arte Moderna in Lugano in 1993; and the artist’s Retrospective at Yale Center for British Art in New Haven in 1999.

For further information on ‘Portrait of George Dyer Talking’ please visit Christie’s website here, and click on the ‘lot notes’ tab.

 

'Study for a Portrait' 1978 © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

'Study for a Portrait' 1978 © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2014. All rights reserved.

‘Study for a Portrait’ 1978, marks Bacon’s departure from the previous decade of canvases dark exploration of mortality, and inner turmoil following the death of Dyer. Bacon’s friendship with John Edwards is considered a factor in this lightening of theme, having met in the Colony Room Club in 1974. In this work Bacon possibly appears to merge both his own and Dyer’s portraits with those of Edwards’s youthful features.

‘Study for a Portrait’ displays a catalogue of interesting Bacon’s texture techniques, his application of paint on this occasion is not wildly applied, but tactically layered with colourful vitality striking through flesh. Bacon used near-dry paint, and buffed his paint brush on his leg. Such techniques combined with his signature use of the unprimed ‘rough’ side of the canvas, result in a painting with a lot to interesting insight both it’s artist’s heart and hands.

For further information on ‘Study for a Portrait’ please visit Christie’s website here, and click on the ‘lot notes’ tab.

Christie’s
8 King Street
St James’s
London
SW1Y 6QT
+44(0)20 7839 9060

*Please note that dates, times and works to be exhibited are subject to change. For more information please visit the Christie’s website.

Word ref: Christies press release and website, credited publications, and the words of Martin Harrison, editor of the forthcoming Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné.

BACON MOORE EXHIBITION BREAKS RECORDS AT THE ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM

FINAL-Bacon-Moore-Poster-9Aug2013‘Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Flesh and Bone’ has become the Ashmolean Museum‘s highest ever attended exhibition.

44,988 visitors attended the exhibition at the Oxford based Museum between September 12th 2013 and January 19th 2014.

‘Flesh and Bone’s’ attendance figures pass the Ashmolean’s previous highest figures: 2011′s ‘Heracles to Alexander the Great’ achieved 43,464, and 2010′s ‘Pre-Raphaelites and Italy’ 38,913.

‘Flesh and Bone’ displayed twenty works by Bacon, alongside twenty sculptures and twenty drawings by Moore. The Estate of Francis Bacon has enjoyed sharing the exhibition’s news and events on it’s social media channels, and equally reading the experiences shared by those who attended the Ashmolean. You can read what visitors said about the exhibition via Storify here.

Praise for ‘Francis Bacon Henry Moore: Flesh and Bone’:

“This is a compact, persuasively argued, dramatically hung show that makes it’s point with concise clarity. It pushes the visitor to reconsider these two artists in the light not just of each other but also of the century that moulded them.” **** Rachel Campbell-Johnston, The Times

“By boldly displaying these two titans together, the curators deserve credit for trying to cast new light on the artists we think we know so well.” Alastair Smart, The Sunday Telegraph

“It is a shock, in this succinct exhibition of two British colossi of the past century, Henry Moore (1898 – 1986) and Francis Bacon 1909 – 1992), to be reminded of just how colossal and original are their achievements.” Marina Vaizey, The Arts Desk

It’s an extremely intense exhibition, its startling juxtapositions pushing you to rethink these artists and the century that built them, and in this sense it works on its own terms, thought-provoking and sharp.” Rachel Cooke, The Observer 

“This exhibition reminds us that with artists such as these, and curators of insight, there is always scope for new discoveries and fascinating revelations.” Simon Wilson, RA Magazine.

The Estate of Francis Bacon would like to extend thanks to Martin Harrison, Richard Calvocoressi and The Henry Moore Foundation, the Ashmolean Museum, Francis Warner, and everyone who contributed to the exhibition.

Finally the Estate would like to say a special thank you to all those who attended the exhibition, viewed Francis Bacon and Henry Moore’s works, and made ‘Flesh and Bone’ so successful, thank you.

 

Word ref: Credited press, special thanks to Theresa Nicolson and Tom Jowett at the Ashmolean Museum.